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At Total Health Systems of Clinton Township, Chesterfield,  Washington and St. Clair Shores we are “a multi-disciplinary practice that provides both traditional medical and holistic therapies with a two-pronged ‘corrective’ and ‘wellness’ approach.” By focusing on correcting joint dysfunction and nervous system coordination with our chiropractic approach, and correcting muscle imbalance with our physical therapy services, we are able to transition our patients from a passive to active care model. By breaking down muscle using soft tissue techniques including massage, stretching, and joint mobilization, followed by a corrective exercise program, we are able to achieve our mission of long term health and wellness.

We also promote holistic health and wellness by making nutrition and supplement recommendations to improve the biochemical aspects of our patient’s health. In this approach, we are looking at the whole person, instead of treating individual conditions.

The healthcare industry is a slow moving pendulum that is swinging toward patient centered healthcare and preventative medicine. We treat patients with various musculoskeletal problems, as well as a myriad of disease states. Until recently, this “sickness model” has dominated the health-care system.

In this “sickness model,” we have seen the following:

• Products and services provided reactively to people with existing disease; and
• Products and services geared mostly for use after the disease has presented or developed.

We treat those patients who actively seek out the “sickness model” of healthcare, while promoting the “wellness model” to them as a viable option if they choose it.

In the paradigm shift to the “wellness model,” we are now seeing:

• Individuals proactively involved in their own health
• Companies proactively involved in their employees’ health and wellness
• Products and services provided proactively to healthy people to make them feel better, slow aging, actively prevent disease from developing, or to detect and treat disease early

Americans tend to see themselves as healthy until they are actively sick, according to results of a new survey. The difference between their perceptions and reality may put their well-being at risk. According to Dr. Charles Schutz, chief medical officer of Destiny Health, which sponsored the survey, “More than anything, the study shows the need for a new definition for the word ‘healthy.’ [Americans’] definition of healthy is ‘I feel fine.’ That is a dangerous notion that needs to be replaced by the understanding that a person is healthy only when he or she is living a healthy lifestyle and is regularly monitoring key risk factors, such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels. “It is a fact that a person who is being properly treated for hypertension may very well be healthier and cause fewer health insurance cost problems for his or her employer than one who feels well and exercises regularly, but who never sees a doctor,” he said.

To that point, Schutz said the greatest employer “healthcare” cost comes in the form of lost productivity that University of Michigan professor Dr. Dee Edington and others have dubbed “presenteeism” — employees coming to work but getting less done due to chronic but not controlled diseases or health behaviors and risks. According to Edington, that cost, while often invisible, well exceeds the healthcare cost of the identifiable illness. The survey of 1,004 adults showed that 67 percent reported being physically active and only 30 percent perceived themselves as being overweight. “The reality, as reported by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), literally reverses those numbers,” Dr. Schutz said. HHS statistics show that more than 60 percent of Americans do not get enough physical activity to yield health benefits and that more than 25 percent are not active at all. HHS statistics show that 64 percent of Americans are overweight. Similar disparities emerge from other data collected in the Destiny Health Study: While three-quarters of the survey respondents considered themselves “healthy,” a research program funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that nearly half the U.S. population (125 million) “live with at least one chronic health condition and that many live with more than one.” 88 percent of those surveyed said they believed their health could be improved by eating healthy foods. Yet 43 percent of the survey respondents acknowledged dining on fast food one or more times per week, and almost 90 percent of those said they eat processed snack foods regularly. Dr. Schutz described the results as “disturbing, but not surprising news” that dramatizes the urgent need for health-education programs, wellness initiatives and incentives that encourage employees to adopt better health habits.

If you are looking for a healthcare facility that is interested in treating “you”, and not a disease or condition, Total Health Systems of Macomb County is the perfect fit for all your healthcare needs.